Plugging a Tire DIY

 

Recently, I picked up a self-tapping screw in my tire.  Not sure where it happened, but I’m betting it was in the parking lot of my work.  Fortunately, the screw itself made a pretty good seal, so I wasn’t leaking air very fast, (about 7 psi overnight), so I went and bought a tire repair kit.  The kit I ended up getting has everything you might need to plug or patch a tire and cost me just around $10, but it’s pretty common to find just a plug kit for around $5.  Once I had my repair kit, I grabbed a few other tools and went to work!  It probably took me about 10 minutes to do it, but I got lucky that I didn’t need to remove the tire.  I decided to just plug the tire for now since the hole was pretty small and I don’t have a tire changer, but next time I go get an oil change, I may very likely patch it then.IMG_2348.JPG

Tools used:

Flat-head screw driver

Vise grips (pliers would be fine too)

Tire reamer (comes with repair kit)

Plug Hook (comes with repair kit)

Utility Knife

Gloves (not needed, but keeps your hands clean)

First, I used my screw driver to get the bolt out far enough to grab it with my vise grips.  I didn’t need to take the wheel off the car to do this, I just parked it in such a way that I had access.  I just put the car in park, but I should have probably used the e-brake too since the car moved a few inches when I put in the plug.  Once I got a good grip on the bolt, I slowly pulled it out.  I didn’t let out any air or anything so, air started escaping pretty quickly after doing this.  I then inserted the reamer into the hole and pushed it in and out a few ti

mes.  This is just to clean the hole and make it big enough to put the plug in.  I left the reamer in the hole to keep the air in while I prepare the plug.  I took out a plug and threaded it through the eye of the plug hook.  The one I bought actually splits apart when you pull it out, others are actually more hook-like.  I tried to push in the plug, but the hole was a little too small, so I reamed it a little more.  I then pushed the plug in, with some effort, until only about 1/3 of each end of the plug was showing.  I then very quickly pulled out the hook, leaving the plug behind.  The last step is to cut off the tails of the plug, I left a little bit on assuming that it will be smashed while driving.

IMG_2351
The offending screw.

And that’s it.  It was really easy.  You can get this done at a shop for pretty cheap, so it’s not an amazing way to save money, but you will save a buck or two by doing it yourself and maybe some time.  I know that Costco does this for around $11.  I’m sure other places are about the same, but for how simple it is, and how little time it takes, it’s a nice little DIY repair that I think pretty much anyone can do and I would personally much rather do it myself than wait for an hour or so for a shop to get around to it.  It might even be a good idea to keep a kit in the car in case you need to plug while on a trip.  Of course, if you are unsure, always err on the side of caution.  If the hole is too large or in the side-wall of the tire, the damage may not be repairable.  If the steel rings in the tire get damaged, or exposed, they can rust and the tire can fail catastrophically later too due to rusting.

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